WHO WAS ENRIQUE GARCÍA?

 

At the beginning of the 20th century, this guitar maker, born in Madrid and established in Barcelona, achieved great prestige and relaunched the Catalan school of guitar makers.

The quality of his work enabled him to maintain close contact with prestigious guitarists of his time, such as Francisco Tárrega and Miquel Llobet.

 

 

 

EVENT PROGRAM:

7:15 p.m.

Introduction to the work of Enrique García, by Antonio Manjón

7:30 p.m.

Colloquium of guitar players on García's work

8:00 p.m.

Guitar recital with an Enrique García's guitar.

Interpreter: (to be communicated shortly)

 

 

ENRIQUE GARCÍA SHORT BIO

Enrique García Castillo was born in Madrid in 1868. He was the son of a guitar manufacturer, Juan García, but he began his apprenticeship in the prestigious workshop of Manuel Ramírez, for whom he worked for several years. In 1893 he won the first prize at the Chicago World's Fair.

In 1895 he moved to Barcelona, where he opened a workshop at C. Aragó nº 455. In 1903 he moved his workshop to C. Aragó nº 369 and in 1908 he moved again, this time to Passeig de Sant Joan nº 110.

The best guitarists of the moment were concentrated in Barcelona at the beginning of the 20th century. The quality of Enrique García's work made this guitar maker a benchmark, which was a boost for the Catalan School of guitar makers.

 

He died on October 31, 1922. One day later, a chronicle appeared in "El Noticiero Universal", a Barcelona newspaper, in which it could be read:

“He came to acquire such a perfection in his art that it can be affirmed without exaggeration that the guitars he built surpass in quality and quantity of sound the best that have ever been made, even those of the famous Torres”

 

”There are well-founded hopes that the brilliant name of the García guitars will not be extinguished, since his only and intelligent disciple Francisco Simplicio, continues the work of his master, and has given some good example of it. Rest in peace the distinguished guitar maker.”

 

 


 

 

 

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